Universtiy of Miami Miller School of Medicine Graduate Studies

News

Collections conducted at 11 construction sites in 2017 and 2018 found mosquitoes living and actively reproducing in large numbers in protected places where water can accumulate.

Construction Sites Are Excellent Breeding Grounds for Vector Mosquitoes, Researchers Find

January 09, 2019

Researchers from the Public Health Sciences Department at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, collaborating with scientists from the Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control Division, set out to determine if urbanization — altering the natural environment to accommodate increasing human populations — was creating new places in which mosquito populations could also thrive.

Read more about the research findings »

At the Micah Batchelor Awards ceremony, from left, Henri R. Ford, M.D, MHA, Brent Pfeiffer, M.D., Ph.D., Merline Benny, M.D., Juan Solano, M.D., Asha Pillai, M.D., Judy Schaechter, M.D., MBA, and President Julio Frenk.

Four Researchers Honored by the Batchelor Foundation

December 14, 2018

The 14th presentation of the Micah Batchelor Awards for Excellence in Children’s Health Research, created to recognize and inspire the development of innovative ideas and solutions to improve the health and well-being of children, took place November 8. Four researchers from Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine were honored at the ceremony.

Read more about the awards »

Seth J. Schwartz, Ph.D., presenting his research findings.

Venezuela Spotlight: UM Study Finds More Stress among Migrants in Colombia than in U.S.

December 05, 2018

Once Latin America’s wealthiest nation, Venezuela is now an economic and political shell of its former self. As Venezuelans continue their mass exodus for survival, newly published research by a public health researcher and developmental psychologist at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, reveals surprising news about this population’s levels of self-reported stress in their new homelands.

Read more about the study »

A Safer Way to Edit Genes?

October 31, 2018

CRISPR-Cas9 has set the research community on fire for its gene editing efficiency. But that doesn’t mean we can’t do better. Now, in a paper published in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have shown a system used for decades in bacteria can also edit human cells. With a little optimization, this approach — called recombineering — could be a safer way to edit genes.

Read more about recombineering »

Taming a Toxic Stew

October 12, 2018

For months, the news has been filled with stories of toxic algal blooms fouling Florida’s waterways and coastline. The algae Karenia brevis has caused the worst red tide along Florida’s southwest coast in more than a decade, and a blue-green algae called cyanobacteria has coated the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie rivers and other freshwater canals.

Read more about the research project »